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How We Show Up At Work and Make Room for Difference

Tanenbaum Deputy CEO, Mark Fowler

Dear Friends,

I recently was profiled by Lower Manhattan HeadQuarters (LMHQ) in their monthly Q+A segment about all things Tanenbaum and all things me. As Deputy-CEO for Tanenbaum I am tasked with overseeing all of Tanenbaum’s program areas, along with fund development and communications. But the longest section of my early career began in public education and working with at-risk youth. I’m also an ordained interfaith/interspiritual minister and graduate of One Spirit Interfaith Seminary in New York City, a journey I embarked on while working at Tanenbaum.

These experiences and others, affect how I show up at work daily. Now that I’m in a position of leadership, I try to be very aware that we have to be willing to accommodate the whole person at work. My experiences continue to inform and help me work to create an environment where people feel cared for, respected, and a part of the team. A place where a person’s truth can be told.

I invite you to watch the full interview now and let us know what you think.

Mark Fowler
Deputy CEO, Tanenbaum

Eid Mubarak!

Dear Friends,

The Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha will be celebrated between August 20th and August 21st this year! Eid-al-Adha, also known as the Feast of the Sacrifice, is an important holiday and those observing may wish to take the day off from work to celebrate with family and friends and attend to religious practices like attending mosque.

To learn more about Eid al-Adha and its potential impact on the workplace, read our Eid al-Adha Fact Sheet!

In friendship,

Mark Fowler
Deputy CEO, Tanenbaum


Image credit: Seika via Flickr

International Women’s Day – and Religion!

Dear Friends:

Today is International Women’s Day! Celebrated for over 100 years, this honorary day spotlights achievements of women around the world and recognizes our ongoing need for political, economic and social equality.

Please join in me in honoring women worldwide by reading and sharing two of Tanenbaum’s Combating Extremism resources that highlight the bravery, power and value of women across traditions:

One of the mantras Tanenbaum lives by, is Peace is Possible. Today we add, Equality is Possible!

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO

P.S. I encourage you to take one step further by sharing our resources on social media, using the hashtag #IWD2018, and by following and retweeting @JoyceDubensky and @TanenbaumCenter to make an even wider impact!

Las Vegas—Are Thoughts & Prayers Enough?

Photo Credit: Chris Carlson | AP Photo

Friends,

Yesterday, we awoke to our nation’s deadliest mass shooting in recent history. Again, our elected representatives—and scores of everyday Americans—joined the nation in grief, sharing their “thoughts and prayers” for the victims and their families. These words of comfort come from a sense of solidarity, shock, and horror. For many, they also often come from faith. It is therefore incumbent upon us to ask ourselves whether our heartfelt expressions are all that are required of us.

Our nation’s “thoughts and prayers” have been with too many victims, friends, and loved ones from Sandy Hook, Orlando, San Bernardino and now Las Vegas. It is sad but true that we remember and pray for the nearly 33,000 Americans killed each year by gun violence. Sending thoughts and prayers is an act of solidarity. But without transformative change in our willingness to prevent these national tragedies, we will continue to witness unacceptable levels of violence and death.

Just as our great faiths and traditions urge us to pray for victims and survivors, they also urge us to act.

So, what is one simple and practical step that each of us can take to make our response to THIS tragedy different from ones before? Those of us who believe can review what our sacred texts ask of us—and decide if words alone are enough.

After tragedies we must come together and mourn. We must help those victimized to heal. And we must work to create the change that stops this from happening. Otherwise, we risk becoming part of the problem.

See what some of the world’s great traditions have to say…

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO

BAHÁ’í
Let deeds, not words, be your adorning. Bahá u’lláh, Hidden Words Persian 5

BUDDHISM
Whoever, by a good deed, covers the evil done, such a one illumines this world like the moon freed from clouds. Dhammapada 173

CHRISTIANITY
What does it profit, my brethren, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can faith save him? If a brother or sister is naked and destitute of daily food, and one of you says to them, “Depart in peace, be warmed and filled,” but you do not give them the things which are needed for the body, what does it profit? Thus also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead. James 2:14-21

HINDUISM
The wise see knowledge and action as one; they see truly. Bhagavad Gita 5.4, 5

ISLAM
Whoever among you sees an evil action, let him change it with his hand; if he cannot, then with his tongue; and if he cannot, then with his heart, and that is the weakest of faith.” Narrated in Shaih Muslim.

JUDAISM
I call heaven and earth to witness: whether Jew or Gentile, whether man or woman, whether servant or freeman, they are all equal in this: that the Holy Spirit rests upon them in accordance with their deeds! Midrash, Seder Eliyahu Rabbah 10

SIKHISM
By their deeds and their actions, they shall be judged. God Himself is True, and True is His Court. Guru Granth Sahib (34)

NATIVE AMERICAN
It is no longer good enough to cry peace, we must act peace, live peace and live in peace. Shenandoah

ZOROASTRIANISM
A thousand people cannot convince one by words to the extent that one person can convince a thousand by action. Denkard 6.31 

Houston – America at Our Best

Children rescued in Houston after Hurricane Harvey. Credit: Harris County Sheriff’s Office/Twitter

Dear Friends,

As I watched the flooding in Houston and saw elderly nursing home patients sitting waist-deep in water, I felt the same, overwhelming sadness that people across the nation were feeling. But amid that sadness, I was also lifted up by the example of volunteers and rescue teams who readily risked their lives to save others.
This is what America should be. It is who we are at our best.
And it is what our different faiths call on us to do. That’s why I wanted to share some wisdom from across the world’s faiths and beliefsIt reminds us of our shared and highest ideals.

And it reminds us that, when we help one another, we create the nation for which we are searching.

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO, Tanenbaum


SHARED VISIONS | GOOD DEEDS

Baha’i
By faith is meant, first, conscious knowledge, and second, the practice of good deeds.  ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Baha’i World Faith, p. 383
Buddhism
Whoever, by a good deed, covers the evil done, such a one illumines this world like the moon freed from clouds.  Dhammapada 173
Christianity
Let us not lose heart in doing good, for in due time we will reap if we do not grow weary.  Galatians 6:9
Hinduism
The wise see knowledge and action as one; they see truly.  Bhagavad Gita 5.4, 5
Islam
(And) lo! those who believe and do good works are the best of created beings.  Qur’an, 98.7 (Pickthall)
Judaism
I call heaven and earth to witness: whether Jew or Gentile, whether man or woman, whether servant or freeman, they are all equal in this: that the Holy Spirit rests upon them in accordance with their deeds!  Midrash, Seder Eliyahu Rabbah 10
Native American Wisdom
It is no longer good enough to cry peace, we must act peace, live peace and live in peace.  Shenandoah
Sikhism
Without good deeds heaven is not attained.  Sri Guru Granth Sahib
Taoism
Anything evil refrain ye from doing; all good deeds do!  Yin Chih Wên, The Tract of the Quiet Way

6 Tips for Starting a Successful Faith-based ERG

By: Liz Joslin, Workplace Program Associate, Tanenbaum
Published in Diversity Best Practices | August 16, 2016

Faith-based ERGs, once unheard of, are becoming more and more popular among companies on the cutting edge of diversity and inclusion. At Tanenbaum, we have advised many clients at all stages of the process—from deciding if the time is right to establish a faith-based ERG, to inclusive communications, to planning a launch event. Use these five tips as a starting point to creating a successful faith-based ERG at your company.

1. Decide which model is best for your company:
There are three main models for faith-based ERGs: faith-specific, interfaith, and interfaith network. Faith-specific ERGs are created around one particular tradition (ex: American Express has Christian, Jewish, and Muslim groups). Interfaith groups are not specific to any one tradition, but are created to recognize a wide array of affiliations (ex: Tanenbaum Corporate Member Merck’s Interfaith Organization). Finally, in an interfaith network model, multiple faith-specific groups are under the umbrella of an interfaith body (ex: Ford Motor Company’s longstanding Interfaith Network). Consider your current ERG structure, what kind of group has been requested, and resources available when deciding which model is the best fit for your company.

2. Solidify the business case:
The rules that apply for ERGs generally apply for faith-based ERGs as well, including having a solid business case. Talk to interested employees to find out how they think the group will benefit the company. Perhaps the group can serve as an internal focus group on religious accommodations the company is considering (such as Quiet Rooms for prayer, meditation, and reflection), or aid the marketing department in reaching different religious communities. There are many ways a faith-based ERG can positively impact the bottom line.

3. Make sure it is inclusive:
No matter what model you choose, your faith-based ERG must be open to employees of all faiths and none. “The nones” (people who are atheist, agnostic, spiritual or not affiliated with a particular religious tradition) are a part of the religious diversity landscape at your company, and must be considered in the creation of a faith-based ERG. Faith-specific ERGs (i.e. a Christian ERG) should also be open to employees from other faiths who are interested in learning more about their colleagues’ beliefs or in participating in an event the ERG is sponsoring, such as a volunteer event at a local soup kitchen.

Another aspect of inclusion worth addressing is the relationship between LGBT inclusion and religion. If you have an existing LGBT ERG, consider asking that group to provide support and guidance in the establishment of the faith-based ERG. This will serve two purposes: the faith-based group will have a mentor group, and the general employee population will see that the two groups are united and working towards the same ultimate goal (inclusion) and are not in opposition.

4. Create a communications strategy:
It may not be immediately clear to employees why the company is putting resources into a faith-based group. Some may feel immediately alienated, or even threatened by the prospect. Your communications strategy will be crucial in conveying the business case, the purpose, and the inclusive nature of the group, while also emphasizing that participating in the group is optional.

5. Seek out strong leaders:
Finding capable employees to take on leadership roles and bringing on an executive sponsor is a crucial part of the creation of any ERG. Finding leaders who are fully aligned with the group’s business case and the company’s values will help to alleviate concerns that employees and senior leaders might have about preferential treatment within the group. An executive sponsor who can be a champion for the group and speak to the inclusive nature of the ERG can also make a positive impact in how the group is viewed within the company.

6. Generate interest through a launch event:
A launch event is a great way to attract members to a new group. The event can be an extension of your communications strategy and showcase the diversity within the group, as well as highlighting the ways in which the group plans to have a positive impact on the business. Having a senior leader (the executive sponsor or another interested party) at the event to give an endorsement can also demonstrate that the company is fully behind the group.

Tanenbaum Urges Tennessee Senate to Reject Efforts to Make the Bible Tennessee’s Official State Book

The Tennessee Senate is set to vote on a bill that would make the Holy Bible Tennessee’s official book.

Speaking on behalf of the Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding, its CEO Joyce Dubensky condemned the bill. “While the Bible is an inspiring book for many, for Tennessee to make it their state book would symbolically exclude citizens of diverse faiths and none at all, including Christians who find the bill to be sacrilegious.”

Supporters of the bill argue that the intention is to highlight the Bible’s historical significance – however many people see the bill as a violation of the separation between church and state.

Dubensky added, “An official state book is a symbol of the state and, presumably, the people within it. As such, it should inspire a cohesive identity and sense of community. Making the Bible Tennessee’s official state book would do the opposite.”

One approach that Tanenbaum proposes is to identify an official state book that is non-sectarian, inspirational and speaks to the highest ethics of all traditions. “This way,” Dubensky noted, “citizens will not feel as if their government is promoting only one group, one viewpoint within a religion or, worse, infringing on their own personal religious or non-religious beliefs.”

 


 

Tanenbaum is a secular, non-sectarian nonprofit that systematically dismantles religious prejudice by tackling religious bullying of students, harassment in workplaces and disparate health treatment for people based on their beliefs. 

 

Combat Extremism: Get the Facts on Islam Diversity

Have you seen the recent #Notinmyname social media campaign? It’s an initiative led by young British Muslims to show defiance and solidarity against ISIS and the terrorist group’s actions. Their goal? To see how a “simple message” can show the world how ISIS misrepresents Islam.

Projects like this remind us of the great diversity among followers of Islam (and indeed all religions).
No one group is the voice for all Muslims.

Today, Tanenbaum therefore shares another practical resource for you to use at home, in the classroom, with your congregation or in your community.

Read, download, and share! Challenge others to ask questions, research the answers, and counter those who stereotype an entire religion. Know the facts and stand up against Islamophobia!

Together, we can become more informed citizens as we work to prevent violent extremism. Peace begins with us.

Join us in Minneapolis!

SThomas_general-session

Dear Friends,

Every year, some of the best thinking around Diversity & Inclusion takes place at the Forum on Workplace Inclusion in Minneapolis. We are proud to once again be among the presenters at this important event.

This year, Tanenbaum will be presenting “The Battle for Inclusion: Exploring Veteran Status and Religion in the Workplace.”
Mark Fowler and Liz Joslin will be joined by:

• Kimberly Mitchell: Director, Easter Seals Dixon Center
• Lisa Rosser: CEO and Founder, The Value of a Veteran
• Michael Burns: Director, Head of ICG Diversity, Citi

If you haven’t already registered for the Forum, click here to do so.If you have, we look forward to seeing you there!

In friendship,

Mark Fowler,
Deputy Chief Executive Officer

Combat Extremism with January Resources from Tanenbaum

Dear Friends,

I wouldn’t be surprised if your in-boxes – like mine – are still flooded with talk of ISIS, terror, and refugees facing a worsening humanitarian crisis. With this, we see rising fear and exploding acts of hatred and Islamophobia. This is a time for action. We can derail the anti-Muslim violence and hate that’s showing up in schools, at home and in our neighborhoods.

This January, Tanenbaum shares another practical resource for use in daily life, in a classroom or with your congregation.

Read, download, and share! Challenge students and children to ask questions, research the answers, and take action by starting a discussion within your community or family about Islamophobia. Take this to your house of worship and learn more about your neighbors.

Together, let’s work to prevent violent extremism. Peace begins with us.

With great hope for 2016,

Joyce S. Dubensky,
CEO

P.S. Your signature makes a difference! Sign and share our Peacemaker’s Statement Against Extremism.

DONATE here to support our work against extremism and our 2016 intervention in Syria.