Posts

Kicking Off Tanenbaum|25

Glasses were raised last week to kick off Tanenbaum’s 25th Anniversary, hosted by Holly Weiss, Partner at Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP. It was a great evening where new and old friends gathered to recognize Tanenbaum’s achievements – while noting that the need for Tanenbaum is greater now than ever.

Everyone present recommitted to forging a future with less hatred, violence and extremism. All agreed—If not now, when?

Check out the gallery of images below, and be sure to reserve your place for our 25th Anniversary Gala on Tuesday, May 23, 2017!

Guastavino’s

Details

Venue Website:

Location

Address:
409 East 59th Street, New York, New York, 10022, United States

Reflections on the People’s Pope by Tanenbaum CEO Joyce S. Dubensky

Dear Friends,

Joyce Dubensky with friends at the 9/11 Memorial

Joyce Dubensky with friends at the 9/11 Memorial

I was among the privileged to be at the 9/11 memorial site in New York City when Pope Francis made his way to the stage to give blessings and speak. People from different faiths and practices  gathered to share prayers for peace; it was an interfaith ceremony held in a place where so many are remembered and so much was lost.

I took away from the crowded room, filled with diverse holy people, some things the Pope said – or that I interpreted from his words.  They are meaningful for me, as a Jewish woman. And perhaps for you, as well.

Pope Francis remembered those who suffered on 9/11 at the hands of individuals who somehow believed inflicting harm was their duty. He linked the lives that we lost, and the pain of those who forever remember them, to people who suffer today amid violence and war – because others continue to impose undue harm.

He spoke of mourning and how peace is not just an abstraction. As I listened, I thought of the child crying, hungry and frightened in war-torn conflicts. I must hear her cries, as if she were my own.

The People’s Pope urged us to seek pathways to peace amid our differences. A peace that stops the fighting but, also, the poverty, destruction and hopelessness.

The People’s Pope sees all people. And he reminds us to join with him.

Join us by reading and sharing our Shared Visions, a project that reminds us how the world’s religions share many core values.

With great gratitude,

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO

When Vaisakhi Is More Than a Holiday

Darbar Harmandir Sahib - the "Golden Temple"

Darbar Harmandir Sahib – the “Golden Temple”

Have you ever wished someone a happy Vaisakhi?

Most people have no idea that the Pentagon is holding a major celebration to celebrate Vaisakhi. Or that Vaisakhi is the birthday of the world’s fifth largest religion. Why? Because the Sikh community as a whole, is often ignored in this country. The time has come to know more about our Sikh neighbors.

Let’s start with the FBI’s most recent Hate Crimes Statistics (released 12/2014) because the findings are telling. Race is still the leading cause of hate crimes in the U.S., followed by sexual-orientation and religion. Among major religious groups, Jewish people are most likely to be attacked (60.3 percent) followed by Muslims (13.7 percent) and people from “other religions” (11.2 percent). Unfortunately, those statistics do not separately track anti-Sikh hate crimes, only including them within “other religions.” Fortunately, this practice has now come to an end. Following years of advocacy, the FBI is finally implementing a system to track anti-Sikh bias, along with bias against many other self-identified religious groups. It’s about time. Because the Sikh community is being attacked.

Last summer in New York City, Joseph Caleca yelled “Osama!” at Sandeep Singh before running him over and dragging Singh for 30 feet. Only days later, a group of teens, male and female, attacked another Sikh man walking to dinner with his mother. These are not isolated incidents. The Sikh community is repeatedly targeted by verbal and physical violence. Sometimes the perpetrators escape apprehension. But in the case of Sandeep Singh, community activism led to Caleca’s arrest and an indictment for attempted murder and hate crime charges.

Such incidents are only one way this community is singled out. Visibly distinct, observant Sikh men wear turbans and have uncut beards. In a society still grappling with diversity, it is therefore no surprise that Sikhs experience workplace discrimination, bias and stereotyping.

Consider New York’s Police Department. Its dress-code requires officers to wear religious head coverings beneath the uniform cap and to maintain short beards, measuring less than one millimeter. With few exceptions, the NYPD refuses to accommodate Sikhs, in contrast to police departments like the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington D.C., which began allowing Sikhs to wear turbans and have full beards in 2012.

There are also daily indignities (or micro-aggressions) that grate at the soul. Take the Sikh who goes to the hospital and is asked to complete the patient intake form. Often, it includes a question about religious preferences and provides a list of religious identities. Many patients find this practice welcoming, while the facility simultaneously learns about their possible needs. But if you’re Sikh, this is not necessarily your experience. Several NYC hewospitals continue to omit Sikhism on these forms, despite repeated requests for inclusion. So when a NYC Sikh patient is hospitalized, the only choice is “other” — even though more than 50,000 Sikhs live in NYC.

Such blatant disregard for an entire community is costly. In one NY health care facility, a nurse shaved and trimmed an elderly Sikh patient’s beard, eyebrows and mustache one month before his death. The patient was religiously mandated never to cut his hair, and his family, who had never seen him shaved or with trimmed hair, did not recognize him. The result, of course, was a law suit.

But perhaps most disturbing, is how Sikh children are tormented. For one Sikh student, this meant being held to the ground by a classmate who forcibly cut his hair. For other children, it means being taunted and called names like “terrorist” and “Osama.”

It does not have to be this way. We can stop acts of hatred and prevent bullying with the help of parents and teachers. Starting at a young age, children can learn that people have different ways of believing (or not believing). And holidays like Vaisakhi provide an easy opportunity for that teachable moment.

With institutional changes, we can improve our neighbors’ lives. What if the NYPD not only pursued hate crimes, but also had Sikh officers who understood the community being targeted? How much better would a Sikh patient’s health care be, if hospital staff knew that being Sikh meant that certain decisions about their care might be made — and knew enough to ask what was needed? And just think how our students would be better prepared as members of the global society, if they understood that diversity, including differences of belief, is not something to fear or hate?

The FBI and the Pentagon are taking steps toward improved relations with the Sikh community. By showing respect for Sikh traditions, they are standing up against bias, hatred and violence. This matters for all of us. Because no one is exempt from exclusion and violence. Today’s bystander may be tomorrow’s victim. And that means we must stand together now.

– Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO

The Unintended Consequences of Pamela Geller’s NYC Bus Ad

Pam Geller’s recent New York City bus ad depicts a man with a scarf wrapped around his head beside the quote, “Killing Jews is worship that brings us closer to Allah” attributed to Hamas MTV. A federal judge ruled that the ad, slated to run on NYC buses and already running in San Francisco and Chicago, are protected by free speech. And the MTA is now banning all political advertisements.

Without question, freedom of speech is a core value and the foundation of our democracy. As such, it must be preserved. But how do we respond to hate speech that is intended to divide us and incite hate? Regardless of Geller’s motive, it is clear that her ad fuels bigotry toward Muslims, by instantaneously conflating 1.6 billion people with the visible few, who perpetrate violent extremism. So what should the MTA do? How do we responsibly balance freedom of speech with messages that may incite violence in our communities?

It sounds simple and it’s said often. The first step is to fight speech with speech. Together, it is our responsibility to condemn, confront and debunk advertisements that perpetuate false stereotypes and marginalize our neighbors. Ironically, in Geller’s fervor to protect her prejudiced view of democracy for people who think like her, an unintended consequence of her actions looms over New York City. Political discourse – one of the bedrocks of democracy – is being shut down by the MTA as they prohibit all political ads. While that may save us from having to witness Geller’s venom in our neighborhoods, our right to free speech will be taken from us and, indeed, all of us will bear the consequences.

On the bright side, however, Geller’s actions have yielded another unintended consequence. Because of her actions, Muslims, Jews and Christians are working together in a united front against her hate-inciting initiative. And that is what our democracy is really all about.

Peacemakers in Our Midst by Joyce Dubensky, CEO

A lot of my work at Tanenbaum involves our Peacemakers. Men and women who are driven by religion to pursue peace and confront violence, hate and horror, even when doing so puts them at risk – either because they may be injured or because their freedom may be circumscribed. These Peacemakers are a special breed, coming from places where the world’s most violent crises often play out. Perhaps because this is my perspective, I have been particularly moved by the tragic deaths of unarmed black men in Ferguson and Staten Island, and I have also been touched by the local peacebuilders in our midst, who are trying to help us move beyond the pain and toward justice.

These are very difficult and complicated times. Community members question the seeming intractability of racial tension in America, the use (and abuse) of power by police officers and the fairness (and unfairness) of the judicial system.  Many are angry and frustrated, moved by a profound sense of injustice. And yet, we see police in New York who have shown restraint and significantly upheld our freedom to protest. Additionally, there are those who seek to capitalize on the unrest – by perpetuating the divide, looting, and menacing law enforcement and community members alike.

Standing amid all this tension are anti-racist religious and spiritual leaders, who are working locally and tirelessly to promote peace.

In Ferguson, religious leaders called on their community to respond peacefully to the grand jury’s decision in the Michael Brown case, and to take positive action such as by working collectively and voting. In New York City, spiritual leaders across many faiths have also united to pursue justice following the death of Eric Garner during an arrest by police. Some of them have protested and watched as members of their communities were incarcerated, while others have called on their congregations to speak with one voice for equal treatment for all

In response to the death of Eric Garner, a coalition of NYC religious and spiritual leaders are calling on our political leaders to make changes that they hope will help rebuild the community’s trust with police officers and government officials. In a signed letter, they delineated a series of actions they hope will move us forward, including a call for NY Attorney General Eric Schneiderman to appoint Special Prosecutors to investigate and prosecute incidents when there is a question of excessive force and wrongful death involving police officers.  Whether in response to their voices or otherwise, I am delighted to note that Mr. Schneiderman has now asked Governor Cuomo to take state action to enable such a process to move forward, subject to subsequent legislation.

These generally unknown anti-racist religious and spiritual leaders in New York are not household names like Martin Luther King, Jr.  But even though they are not widely acknowledged, they are active in our midst, seeking to heal our communities and to restore trust.

So, while we always support the Tanenbaum Peacemakers working in places like Iraq, Nigeria, El Salvador and Israel, we also pause today, and thank those who are working at home, striving to make our communities safer for all of us.

– Joyce S. Dubensky, CEO

Venues

Kicking Off Tanenbaum|25

Glasses were raised last week to kick off Tanenbaum’s 25th Anniversary, hosted by Holly Weiss, Partner at Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP. It was a great evening where new and old friends gathered to recognize Tanenbaum’s achievements – while noting that the need for Tanenbaum is greater now than ever.

Everyone present recommitted to forging a future with less hatred, violence and extremism. All agreed—If not now, when?

Check out the gallery of images below, and be sure to reserve your place for our 25th Anniversary Gala on Tuesday, May 23, 2017!

Guastavino’s

Details

Venue Website:

Location

Address:
409 East 59th Street, New York, New York, 10022, United States

Reflections on the People’s Pope by Tanenbaum CEO Joyce S. Dubensky

Dear Friends,

Joyce Dubensky with friends at the 9/11 Memorial

Joyce Dubensky with friends at the 9/11 Memorial

I was among the privileged to be at the 9/11 memorial site in New York City when Pope Francis made his way to the stage to give blessings and speak. People from different faiths and practices  gathered to share prayers for peace; it was an interfaith ceremony held in a place where so many are remembered and so much was lost.

I took away from the crowded room, filled with diverse holy people, some things the Pope said – or that I interpreted from his words.  They are meaningful for me, as a Jewish woman. And perhaps for you, as well.

Pope Francis remembered those who suffered on 9/11 at the hands of individuals who somehow believed inflicting harm was their duty. He linked the lives that we lost, and the pain of those who forever remember them, to people who suffer today amid violence and war – because others continue to impose undue harm.

He spoke of mourning and how peace is not just an abstraction. As I listened, I thought of the child crying, hungry and frightened in war-torn conflicts. I must hear her cries, as if she were my own.

The People’s Pope urged us to seek pathways to peace amid our differences. A peace that stops the fighting but, also, the poverty, destruction and hopelessness.

The People’s Pope sees all people. And he reminds us to join with him.

Join us by reading and sharing our Shared Visions, a project that reminds us how the world’s religions share many core values.

With great gratitude,

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO

When Vaisakhi Is More Than a Holiday

Darbar Harmandir Sahib - the "Golden Temple"

Darbar Harmandir Sahib – the “Golden Temple”

Have you ever wished someone a happy Vaisakhi?

Most people have no idea that the Pentagon is holding a major celebration to celebrate Vaisakhi. Or that Vaisakhi is the birthday of the world’s fifth largest religion. Why? Because the Sikh community as a whole, is often ignored in this country. The time has come to know more about our Sikh neighbors.

Let’s start with the FBI’s most recent Hate Crimes Statistics (released 12/2014) because the findings are telling. Race is still the leading cause of hate crimes in the U.S., followed by sexual-orientation and religion. Among major religious groups, Jewish people are most likely to be attacked (60.3 percent) followed by Muslims (13.7 percent) and people from “other religions” (11.2 percent). Unfortunately, those statistics do not separately track anti-Sikh hate crimes, only including them within “other religions.” Fortunately, this practice has now come to an end. Following years of advocacy, the FBI is finally implementing a system to track anti-Sikh bias, along with bias against many other self-identified religious groups. It’s about time. Because the Sikh community is being attacked.

Last summer in New York City, Joseph Caleca yelled “Osama!” at Sandeep Singh before running him over and dragging Singh for 30 feet. Only days later, a group of teens, male and female, attacked another Sikh man walking to dinner with his mother. These are not isolated incidents. The Sikh community is repeatedly targeted by verbal and physical violence. Sometimes the perpetrators escape apprehension. But in the case of Sandeep Singh, community activism led to Caleca’s arrest and an indictment for attempted murder and hate crime charges.

Such incidents are only one way this community is singled out. Visibly distinct, observant Sikh men wear turbans and have uncut beards. In a society still grappling with diversity, it is therefore no surprise that Sikhs experience workplace discrimination, bias and stereotyping.

Consider New York’s Police Department. Its dress-code requires officers to wear religious head coverings beneath the uniform cap and to maintain short beards, measuring less than one millimeter. With few exceptions, the NYPD refuses to accommodate Sikhs, in contrast to police departments like the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington D.C., which began allowing Sikhs to wear turbans and have full beards in 2012.

There are also daily indignities (or micro-aggressions) that grate at the soul. Take the Sikh who goes to the hospital and is asked to complete the patient intake form. Often, it includes a question about religious preferences and provides a list of religious identities. Many patients find this practice welcoming, while the facility simultaneously learns about their possible needs. But if you’re Sikh, this is not necessarily your experience. Several NYC hewospitals continue to omit Sikhism on these forms, despite repeated requests for inclusion. So when a NYC Sikh patient is hospitalized, the only choice is “other” — even though more than 50,000 Sikhs live in NYC.

Such blatant disregard for an entire community is costly. In one NY health care facility, a nurse shaved and trimmed an elderly Sikh patient’s beard, eyebrows and mustache one month before his death. The patient was religiously mandated never to cut his hair, and his family, who had never seen him shaved or with trimmed hair, did not recognize him. The result, of course, was a law suit.

But perhaps most disturbing, is how Sikh children are tormented. For one Sikh student, this meant being held to the ground by a classmate who forcibly cut his hair. For other children, it means being taunted and called names like “terrorist” and “Osama.”

It does not have to be this way. We can stop acts of hatred and prevent bullying with the help of parents and teachers. Starting at a young age, children can learn that people have different ways of believing (or not believing). And holidays like Vaisakhi provide an easy opportunity for that teachable moment.

With institutional changes, we can improve our neighbors’ lives. What if the NYPD not only pursued hate crimes, but also had Sikh officers who understood the community being targeted? How much better would a Sikh patient’s health care be, if hospital staff knew that being Sikh meant that certain decisions about their care might be made — and knew enough to ask what was needed? And just think how our students would be better prepared as members of the global society, if they understood that diversity, including differences of belief, is not something to fear or hate?

The FBI and the Pentagon are taking steps toward improved relations with the Sikh community. By showing respect for Sikh traditions, they are standing up against bias, hatred and violence. This matters for all of us. Because no one is exempt from exclusion and violence. Today’s bystander may be tomorrow’s victim. And that means we must stand together now.

– Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO

The Unintended Consequences of Pamela Geller’s NYC Bus Ad

Pam Geller’s recent New York City bus ad depicts a man with a scarf wrapped around his head beside the quote, “Killing Jews is worship that brings us closer to Allah” attributed to Hamas MTV. A federal judge ruled that the ad, slated to run on NYC buses and already running in San Francisco and Chicago, are protected by free speech. And the MTA is now banning all political advertisements.

Without question, freedom of speech is a core value and the foundation of our democracy. As such, it must be preserved. But how do we respond to hate speech that is intended to divide us and incite hate? Regardless of Geller’s motive, it is clear that her ad fuels bigotry toward Muslims, by instantaneously conflating 1.6 billion people with the visible few, who perpetrate violent extremism. So what should the MTA do? How do we responsibly balance freedom of speech with messages that may incite violence in our communities?

It sounds simple and it’s said often. The first step is to fight speech with speech. Together, it is our responsibility to condemn, confront and debunk advertisements that perpetuate false stereotypes and marginalize our neighbors. Ironically, in Geller’s fervor to protect her prejudiced view of democracy for people who think like her, an unintended consequence of her actions looms over New York City. Political discourse – one of the bedrocks of democracy – is being shut down by the MTA as they prohibit all political ads. While that may save us from having to witness Geller’s venom in our neighborhoods, our right to free speech will be taken from us and, indeed, all of us will bear the consequences.

On the bright side, however, Geller’s actions have yielded another unintended consequence. Because of her actions, Muslims, Jews and Christians are working together in a united front against her hate-inciting initiative. And that is what our democracy is really all about.

Peacemakers in Our Midst by Joyce Dubensky, CEO

A lot of my work at Tanenbaum involves our Peacemakers. Men and women who are driven by religion to pursue peace and confront violence, hate and horror, even when doing so puts them at risk – either because they may be injured or because their freedom may be circumscribed. These Peacemakers are a special breed, coming from places where the world’s most violent crises often play out. Perhaps because this is my perspective, I have been particularly moved by the tragic deaths of unarmed black men in Ferguson and Staten Island, and I have also been touched by the local peacebuilders in our midst, who are trying to help us move beyond the pain and toward justice.

These are very difficult and complicated times. Community members question the seeming intractability of racial tension in America, the use (and abuse) of power by police officers and the fairness (and unfairness) of the judicial system.  Many are angry and frustrated, moved by a profound sense of injustice. And yet, we see police in New York who have shown restraint and significantly upheld our freedom to protest. Additionally, there are those who seek to capitalize on the unrest – by perpetuating the divide, looting, and menacing law enforcement and community members alike.

Standing amid all this tension are anti-racist religious and spiritual leaders, who are working locally and tirelessly to promote peace.

In Ferguson, religious leaders called on their community to respond peacefully to the grand jury’s decision in the Michael Brown case, and to take positive action such as by working collectively and voting. In New York City, spiritual leaders across many faiths have also united to pursue justice following the death of Eric Garner during an arrest by police. Some of them have protested and watched as members of their communities were incarcerated, while others have called on their congregations to speak with one voice for equal treatment for all

In response to the death of Eric Garner, a coalition of NYC religious and spiritual leaders are calling on our political leaders to make changes that they hope will help rebuild the community’s trust with police officers and government officials. In a signed letter, they delineated a series of actions they hope will move us forward, including a call for NY Attorney General Eric Schneiderman to appoint Special Prosecutors to investigate and prosecute incidents when there is a question of excessive force and wrongful death involving police officers.  Whether in response to their voices or otherwise, I am delighted to note that Mr. Schneiderman has now asked Governor Cuomo to take state action to enable such a process to move forward, subject to subsequent legislation.

These generally unknown anti-racist religious and spiritual leaders in New York are not household names like Martin Luther King, Jr.  But even though they are not widely acknowledged, they are active in our midst, seeking to heal our communities and to restore trust.

So, while we always support the Tanenbaum Peacemakers working in places like Iraq, Nigeria, El Salvador and Israel, we also pause today, and thank those who are working at home, striving to make our communities safer for all of us.

– Joyce S. Dubensky, CEO