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The Truth About White Supremacy – Combating Extremism

Dear Friends,

When you hear “white supremacy,” what comes to mind? Do you think of the white supremacy groups that posted more than a dozen fliers at Pioneer High School in San Jose, California? Or of vandalized Jewish cemeteries? Or domestic terrorism?

The fact is . . . white supremacy is resurging. And we all need to pay attention. Who is a white supremacist? What do they believe? (And what about diversity among haters?) Take a look.

Stay informed and empowered,
Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO

P.S. Share and use our monthly resources. Encourage friends, neighbors, educators and community leaders to sign up to receive them.

P.P.S. And check out our interview with reformed white supremacist Arno Michaelis.

A neo-Nazi’s Transformation: Combating Extremism

Dear Friends,

For this year’s final installment of our Combating Extremism campaign, we introduce a reformed neo-Nazi named Arno. Once an avid hater, Arno now dedicates his life to spreading compassion.

If the venom of this past year made you skeptical that simple acts of kindness can transform lives, Arno’s story is worth a look. After all, if a right-wing extremist can find a way forward—we all can.

  • Arno: A Story of Transformation: In this short video, former white supremacist Arno Michaelis shares why he became a neo-Nazi, how he became exhausted by hatred, and how unexpected kindness changed the course of his life.
  • Why Scrutinizing Information Matters: Here, Arno reflects on the value of challenging ourselves to scrutinize information in order to dispel lies, hate, prejudice and division.
  • Questions for Consideration – A Resource for High School Students and Educators on the Videos

Arno’s transformation reminds us that change is possible. And that’s what Tanenbaum is all about. Throughout the coming year, I invite you to join us in challenging the status quo, moving beyond mere tolerance, and defusing radical hate with radical love.

Please watch and share these videos. And please, make a donation today—so we can continue to battle hate and extremism tomorrow.

With firm resolve,

Joyce Dubensky
CEO

PS. Please donate now.

PSS. Download all our monthly resources and sign up to receive our free Combating Extremism materials next month.  They’re great for educators, religious and and community leaders, and parents. Try them, and let us know what you think!

Religious diversity is increasing at the office, and so are pitfalls: Top 5 News Stories

Religious diversity is increasing at the office, and so are pitfalls

As religious diversity in the workplace increases, the opportunities for conflicts over religions also rises. In fact, one-third of American workers report that they have seen or experienced religious bias in the workplace. From Atheists to Evangelicals, discrimination based on beliefs or non-beliefs is a significant issue for employers and employees alike.

March on Washington showcased religious roots of Civil Rights …    

Modern advocates for civil rights often forget that the Civil Rights movement was largely grounded in religious roots. Religious leaders used their pulpits and their religions as sources for justice and racial equality. "It was natural for blacks to turn to the church in the civil rights movement as it was always this solid rock amid oppression," Aldon Morris, a sociologist at Northwestern University said. "You could summon up a great deal of courage through religion. It could empower people to confront all kinds of obstacles, including violence."

Labor Day and the unions' forgotten religious roots    

Labor Day orignated as the brain-child of the Noble Order of the Knights of Labor. The first labor unions joined forces with religious insitutions to defend the poor and provide legitimacy to the movement. But as religiosity is on the decline, the future of Labor Day hangs in the balance.

Atheist group can sue IRS over enforcement of pulpit politicking

A federal judged granted the atheist group Freedom from Religion Foundation permission to proceed with its lawsuit against the Internal Revenue Service. The group is suing the IRS for not enforcing its ban on the political activity of tax-exempt religious organizations. The FFRF wants the IRS to strengthen the ban.

Haynes column: School surrenders to religious intolerance    

A school put up a bullitein board about the five pillars of Islam as part of a curriculum that educates students about different faiths within their historical context. A picture of the board uploaded to facebook sparked community outrage as the misleading tag accused the board of promoting Islam while Christian prayers were strictly forbidden. Though this was not the purpose of the bullitein board, and other bullitein boards featuring different religions are placed around the school, the administration decided to take down the board on Islam.