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Combat Extremism – Use December Resources from Tanenbaum

In the wake of continued violent extremism and escalating intolerance fueled by fear and misinformation, Tanenbaum remembers what unites us in striving for a just society. Shared visions of generosity, gratitude, friendship, and forgiveness tie us together in our search for peace and justice.

Learning more about one another allows us to stand together in this search. This month, Tanenbaum shares another practical resource for use in daily life or in a classroom.

  • Calls and Prayers for Peace and Justice: Read calls and prayers for peace and justice from many of the world’s great religions and philosophical traditions. They echo common threads that connect us, regardless of our different beliefs or lack of belief.
  • QUESTIONS for Students and Educators: A question sheet that may be used by educators and creative parents alike alongside Calls and Prayers for Peace and Justice, which explores common themes, shared ethics and similar visions of peace that emerge across different faith and philosophical traditions.
Read, download, and share! Challenge students and children to ask questions, research the answers, and take action by starting a discussion within your community or family about shared beliefs for peace. Take this to your house of worship and learn more about your neighbors.
Together, let’s work to prevent violent extremism. Peace begins with us.

P.S. Your signature makes a difference! Sign and share our Peacemaker’s Statement Against Extremism.

 

Click here to support our work against extremism and our 2016 intervention in Syria.

From Alaska to the Bahamas, Tanenbaum’s Education Programming Resonates

In mid-February and early March, I had the pleasure of presenting at two very specialized education conferences.

The first was the Beyond School Hours conference in Burlingame, CA. This conference is designed for out-of-school time educators, and I presented on our K-6 World Olympics curriculum, which has been very successful in after-school settings. The participants in those sessions came from as far as Alaska to the Bahamas and it seemed the only complaint they had was that I didn’t have enough copies of the curricula to sell!

A specific idea that resonated with the group was normalizing difference in contrast to celebrating similarities. While both are important, a greater emphasis seems to be put on the latter in diversity work. In doing a few activities from the curriculum, participants were able to experience subtle ways in which difference can be normalized in everyday lessons.

The second conference, the National Association of Independent Schools conference, was in my hometown of Seattle. I facilitated a panel titled Religion in Independent Schools: Innovations in Multicultural Education. The panel members were three independent school practitioners who have used Tanenbaum’s work successfully, and they shared their perspectives with over 100 attendees.
 
It was gratifying to see how our creative panelists have taken our pedagogy and lessons, and adapted them to fit their classrooms’ needs. A major take-away from this experience was the power of co-presenting at conferences. Also, the standing-room only crowd goes to show that issues around religious identity in schools are not limited to the topic of separation of church and state in public schools. One of the Education program’s initiatives is to work more deeply with independent school educators. Seems like we’re off to a great start!
– Anshu Wahi, Senior Program Associate