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World Peace Wednesdays: Talks About “The Other”

Peacemaker in Action Nozizwe Madlala-Routledge from South Africa.

Tanenbaum Peacemaker in Action Nozizwe Madlala-Routledge talks about how religion can fuel conflict when people view one another as enemies rather than a friend and as an image of God. 
 
Nozizwe is a South African pacifist, anchored by her Quaker faith, who has dedicated her life to peacefully seeking social justice. Nozizwe first became politically active in the 1970s, amidst the oppressive conditions of South Africa's apartheid regime. Nozizwe was jailed three times for her affiliation with the African National Congress, the last time spending one year in solitary confinement without a trial. After her release, Nozizwe went on to mediate intra-black conflicts outside of Durban, and helped draft an historic, post-apartheid constitution for South Africa in 1991. Until August 2007, Nozizwe served as South Africa's Deputy Minister of Health, leading an effort to ensure that AIDS patients receive the best possible treatment.
 
Learn more about Nozizwe Madlala-Routledge's life as a peacemaker: https://tanenbaum.org/programs/peace/peacemaker-awardees/nozizwe-madlala-… 
 
This video was made possible by grants from Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Henry Luce Foundation. The statements made and views expressed are solely the responsibility of Tanenbaum. Tanenbaum's Peacemakers in Action program is also supported by the Leir Charitable Foundations.
 

Four Missionaries may face Libya death penalty after arrest in Benghazi: News Roundup

In the news this week, four missionaries arrested in Benghazi may face Libya death penalty, Pope electors are sizing up their peers, and other stories.

Four foreign missionaries were arrested in Benghazi, Libya, last week on charges of printing and distributing materials that promote Christianity. One is an American citizen.
The Associated Press, which broke the news, reports that Benghazi police claim to have "found 45,000 books in [the missionaries'] possession and that another 25,000 have already been distributed."

"They were arrested on Tuesday at a publishing house where they were printing thousands of books that called for conversion to Christianity," Hussein Bin Hmeid, spokesman for Libya's Preventative Security, toldReuters. "Proselytizing is forbidden in Libya. We are a 100 percent Muslim country and this kind of action affects our national security." Christianity Today

There is no formal nominating process for choosing the man to succeed Pope Benedict XVI, and campaigning for oneself is counterproductive. But the cardinals who will file into the Sistine Chapel next month to elect a new leader of the Roman Catholic Church have been quietly sizing up potential candidates for years.

They were impressed when the young soon-to-be-cardinal of Manila, Luis Antonio Tagle, told bishops gathered for a momentous synod in Rome last October that the church should listen more and admit its mistakes. They took note a year ago when Archbishop Timothy M. Dolan of New York delivered a winning address on evangelization to the College of Cardinals, the day before the pope gave him the red hat of a cardinal. The New York Times

A U.N. committee has accused U.S. legal authorities of failing to fully pursue cases of child sex abuse in religious groups, an issue especially troubling the Roman Catholic Church.
The Committee on the Rights of the Child wrote this month that it was “deeply concerned” to find widespread sexual abuse by clerics and staff of religious institutions and “a lack of measures … to properly investigate cases and prosecute them”.

Britain’s National Secular Society, which drew attention on Monday to the little-noticed report, said it hoped the Catholic pope to be elected next month would open Church files to help prosecute as yet undiscovered cases of clerical sexual abuse. Reuters

Employees at a Motor Vehicle Commission office in New Jersey called the police on Feb. 2, when a man claiming to be a "Pastafarian" — a follower of a parody religion called the "Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster" — refused to take a pasta strainer off his head for a new license photo.

Aaron Williams, 25, told employees at the South Brunswick motor vehicle office that “his pasta strainer was a religious head covering and it was his right to wear it for his license photo,” according to a South Brunswick Police Department report newly obtained by The Smoking Gun.
 
Per The Smoking Gun, officers were eventually able to convince Williams to remove the strainer for his picture and reported that Williams was calm and cooperative throughout the incident. The tongue-in-cheek Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster was founded, in part, to protest the teaching of creationism in schools, according to CBS New York. The Huffington Post
 

World Peace Wednesdays: Meet Ephraim

Meet Peacemaker in Action, Ephraim Isaac from Ethiopia.

For the past 40 years, Ephraim has worked to reconcile religious and ethnic groups in his native Ethiopia and its neighbor to the north, Eritrea. Drawing on Ethiopia's ancient social system, he involves elders as mediators, tapping into a tradition that has credibility among the warring parties.

Son of a Yemenite Jewish father and an Oromo Ethiopian mother, Ephraim's diverse upbringing has enabled him to move among different people with ease. And thanks to his life experiences, his mediation efforts are colored by a deep-seated appreciation for the costs of war and the value of peace.

Click here to learn more about Ephraim's journey as a peacemaker: https://tanenbaum.org/programs/peace/peacemaker-awardees/dr-ephraim-isaac-ethiopia

This video was made possible by grants from Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Henry Luce Foundation. The statements made and views expressed are solely the responsibility of Tanenbaum. Tanenbaum's Peacemakers in Action program is also supported by the Leir Charitable Foundations.

Music: "Easy Lemon" by Kevin Macleod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons "Attribution 3.0"

World Peace Wednesdays: Bill Lowrey on Healing

Tanenbaum Peacemaker in Action Bill Lowrey talks about healing after violent conflict. Click here to learn more about Bill Lowrey's life as a peacemaker.

This video was made possible by grants from Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Henry Luce Foundation. The statements made and views expressed are solely the responsibility of Tanenbaum. Tanenbaum's Peacemakers in Action program is also supported by the Leir Charitable Foundations.

World Peace Wednesdays: Nozizwe on justice and humility

Tanenbaum Peacemaker in Action Nozizwe Madlala-Routledge discusses how all faiths teach us justice, humility, and to love thy neighbor and how they can be avenues to peace. 

Click here to learn more about Nozizwe Madlala-Routledge's life as a peacemaker.

This video was made possible by grants from Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Henry Luce Foundation. The statements made and views expressed are solely the responsibility of Tanenbaum. Tanenbaum's Peacemakers in Action program is also supported by the Leir Charitable Foundations.

 

World Peace Wednesdays: Meet Jackie

Roll your mouse over the image and click on the links to learn more about Jacky, one of Tanenbaum's Peacemakers in Action.

Perceptions of atheism survey

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World Peace Wednesdays: Meet Sakena

Meet Tanenbaum Peacemaker in Action Sakena Yacoobi.

For more than twenty years, Sakena has risked her life to teach women and children in Afghanistan. In the face of a brutally oppressive Taliban regime, she secretly used education to reclaim Islam—believing that if people had access to the verses themselves, they would see its underlying messages of peace, justice, and equality. Her story is that of a woman of faith seeking to transform her country.

Click here to learn more about Sakena's journey as a peacemaker.

This video was made possible by grants from Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Henry Luce Foundation. The statements made and views expressed are solely the responsibility of Tanenbaum. Tanenbaum's Peacemakers in Action program is also supported by the Leir Charitable Foundations.

World Peace Wednesdays: Meet José

In January 1970, while attending a land reform conference, Tanenbaum Peacemaker in Action José "Chencho" Alas was abducted, beaten, and drugged, before being thrown out of a moving car. This was not the last time he would be targeted. In 1976, after bombings to his house and multiple unwarranted arrests, he was forced to flee the country to preserve his life.

When he returned to El Salvador, he helped establish the Foundation for Self-Sufficiency in Central America, which today supports a wide variety of programs for low-income communities. In his view, only by simultaneously addressing the problems of poverty, violence, education and spiritual development can the country achieve lasting reconciliation.
 
Learn more about José's  journey as a peacemaker: https://tanenbaum.org/programs/peace/peacemaker-awardees/jos%C3%A9-chencho-alas-el-salvador
 
This video was made possible by grants from Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Henry Luce Foundation. The statements made and views expressed are solely the responsibility of Tanenbaum. Tanenbaum's Peacemakers in Action program is also supported by the Leir Charitable Foundations.

20 Years of Religious Progress and Prejudice: Infographic

2013 Infographic thumbnailAs we enter 2013, we wanted to share a snapshot of the last 20 years.  It’s a good reminder of how far we’ve come.  And how far we still need to go.  Please know, that all of us at Tanenbaum remain committed to combating religious prejudice now and as we move forward.  Click on the image to view the full sized version of the infographic.