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Five Ways to Counter Extremists on Social Media

Dear Friends,

This year, social media has been filled with signs of activism. From selfies tweeted at rallies, Facebook debates and campaigns for emergency relief, social media is more than just a way to see and be seen.

The numbers are revealing. In 2015, Pew Research Center found that 76% of online, American adults use social media and 92% of U.S. teens go online daily.

While many use social media in positive or benign ways, we’ve watched people use it to promote #hate and harmful rhetoric, recruit would-be terrorists (including vulnerable youth), and spread #lies. In contrast, we’ve also seen standouts such as Peacemakers in Action Fr. Sava Janjic (Kosovo) and Rev. Jacky Manuputty (Indonesia), who use social media for the #greatergood.

This month, Tanenbaum shares five ways that you, a social media user, can counter – and rise above – harmful social media banter. Some ideas include reporting hate speech, joining a hashtag campaign, and providing accurate information in real time. Remember to use social media prudently, and always in ways that keep you safe.

Please take a few minutes to learn ways you can oppose extremism on social media, in just a few clicks! And then share both resources with high school students and educators in your life.

#PromotePeace,
Joyce S. Dubensky,
Tanenbaum CEO

The Survivor Tree: A story of resilience from 9/11

survivortree_bloomingin2010_911memorialdotorg

The Survivor Tree, 2010 | 911Memorial.org

The tree’s branches were severed but a few green leaves remained, each leaf a sign of life against the blackened sky. On that day, we grieved as New Yorkers, and global citizens, for the innocent lives lost and the knowledge that in many ways, life would never be the same.

The Survivor Tree, November 2001 | 911Memorial.org/

The Survivor Tree, November 2001 | 911Memorial.org

The tree was carefully removed from the World Trade Center site and it began to recover, sprouting new branches and flourishing in the sun. Replanted at the 9/11 Memorial, in the spring, it’s white flowers spread across the sky, honoring the victims and reminding us of our strength when we stand together.

Together, we are a strong, resilient nation, just like The Survivor Tree.

By Nicole Margaretten


To view a slideshow of the Survivor Tree’s transformation, please visit the 911 Memorial’s gallery.

 

United Against Hate

Dear Friends,

With resolute condemnation, Tanenbaum acknowledges the news of another terror attack. It is with a heavy-heart that we mourn the slaughter of 36 innocent people and pray for the 147 others now known to be injured at the Istanbul Ataturk Airport in Turkey.

While those responsible and the motivation remains unclear (both the PKK, a Kurdish organization seeking independence from Turkey, and the Islamic State are suspect) – what remains absolute is that we not fall into the easy trap of assigning blame without knowing the facts. We must not resort to stereotypes and hateful rhetoric. We know where they lead. Too often, to harassment and violence against our Muslim neighbors and those perceived to be Muslim.

Instead, we ask that you join us in standing by our Muslim friends and community members. You can help us create a world grounded in respect and inclusivity.

In short order, we will learn more about the perpetrators. For now, let us remember the victims as the details of this barbaric incident unfold. Let us focus our thoughts on condolences for the families of the deceased, and our prayers for the injured and all affected in Turkey. 

Terrorists, like those who targeted innocent people in Istanbul today, want to make us feel powerless. At Tanenbaum, we will not. We ask you to join us in creating a united front against their hate, more empowered than before.

In sorrow, but with a firm resolve,

Joyce S. Dubensky,
CEO, Tanenbaum

Once again, say NO to Terrorism!

Dear Friends,

Yesterday morning, it happened again. We awoke to the horror, pain and anguish of another act of terrorism, this time the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. The numbers are startling. At least 49 people dead and 53 injured from an attack that occurred at Pulse, a gay club in Orlando during Pride month. So many people, so many families, so many communities destroyed in only a few moments.

Just before the shooting, the assailant, Omar Saddiqui Mateen, reportedly called 911 and pledged allegiance to ISIS. Though Mateen had twice been a person of interest to the FBI, no one saw this slaughter coming. And so, it happened once again on American soil.

Sunday’s massacre at Pulse is clearly an act of terrorism, fueled by unimaginable hatred. At Tanenbaum, we stand in solidarity with the people of Orlando but, also, with the people of the LGBTQ community who are being targeted by violence, once again. Indeed, for this community, the violence is both terrorism and a hate crime.

We know that, in times like these, it’s easy to fall back on stereotypes. Across the news, we hear national voices using them. We hear the voices of division, warning us that if one Muslim is a terrorist, we must fear all. But that is wrong. And we know better. As Americans, it’s our responsibility to make sure that we do not conflate Islam and followers of that tradition with Mateen’s horrific actions. And that we do not forget that haters in other shapes and sizes exist, and that they are also dangerous.

We are at a critical moment in our history. The choice is ours. We must not allow terrorism and hatred to destroy our communities. This is a complex and difficult moment. There are many contributing factors to the growing hatred, division and random violence we fear and experience.

But one thing is certain. Our nation is great because of our shared humanity and great diversity. The massacre at Pulse is an attack against all of us. And that means it is the responsibility of each of us to defy the terrorists. We must refuse to let fear turn to unjust distrust and hatred of our neighbors. The time to stand together is now. And in one voice say, No to hate!

In sorrow, but with a firm resolve,

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO, Tanenbaum

RSVP: Tanenbaum Peacemakers at the United Nations

Tanenbaum_2016_evite

Join us this July 13th for a unique opportunity to hear from six Peacemakers in Action on the critical issues facing us today.
Click here to download the invitation and be sure to RSVP today! Space is limited.

Combat Extremism with January Resources from Tanenbaum

Dear Friends,

I wouldn’t be surprised if your in-boxes – like mine – are still flooded with talk of ISIS, terror, and refugees facing a worsening humanitarian crisis. With this, we see rising fear and exploding acts of hatred and Islamophobia. This is a time for action. We can derail the anti-Muslim violence and hate that’s showing up in schools, at home and in our neighborhoods.

This January, Tanenbaum shares another practical resource for use in daily life, in a classroom or with your congregation.

Read, download, and share! Challenge students and children to ask questions, research the answers, and take action by starting a discussion within your community or family about Islamophobia. Take this to your house of worship and learn more about your neighbors.

Together, let’s work to prevent violent extremism. Peace begins with us.

With great hope for 2016,

Joyce S. Dubensky,
CEO

P.S. Your signature makes a difference! Sign and share our Peacemaker’s Statement Against Extremism.

DONATE here to support our work against extremism and our 2016 intervention in Syria.

Combat Extremism – Use December Resources from Tanenbaum

In the wake of continued violent extremism and escalating intolerance fueled by fear and misinformation, Tanenbaum remembers what unites us in striving for a just society. Shared visions of generosity, gratitude, friendship, and forgiveness tie us together in our search for peace and justice.

Learning more about one another allows us to stand together in this search. This month, Tanenbaum shares another practical resource for use in daily life or in a classroom.

  • Calls and Prayers for Peace and Justice: Read calls and prayers for peace and justice from many of the world’s great religions and philosophical traditions. They echo common threads that connect us, regardless of our different beliefs or lack of belief.
  • QUESTIONS for Students and Educators: A question sheet that may be used by educators and creative parents alike alongside Calls and Prayers for Peace and Justice, which explores common themes, shared ethics and similar visions of peace that emerge across different faith and philosophical traditions.
Read, download, and share! Challenge students and children to ask questions, research the answers, and take action by starting a discussion within your community or family about shared beliefs for peace. Take this to your house of worship and learn more about your neighbors.
Together, let’s work to prevent violent extremism. Peace begins with us.

P.S. Your signature makes a difference! Sign and share our Peacemaker’s Statement Against Extremism.

 

Click here to support our work against extremism and our 2016 intervention in Syria.

From Alaska to the Bahamas, Tanenbaum’s Education Programming Resonates

In mid-February and early March, I had the pleasure of presenting at two very specialized education conferences.

The first was the Beyond School Hours conference in Burlingame, CA. This conference is designed for out-of-school time educators, and I presented on our K-6 World Olympics curriculum, which has been very successful in after-school settings. The participants in those sessions came from as far as Alaska to the Bahamas and it seemed the only complaint they had was that I didn’t have enough copies of the curricula to sell!

A specific idea that resonated with the group was normalizing difference in contrast to celebrating similarities. While both are important, a greater emphasis seems to be put on the latter in diversity work. In doing a few activities from the curriculum, participants were able to experience subtle ways in which difference can be normalized in everyday lessons.

The second conference, the National Association of Independent Schools conference, was in my hometown of Seattle. I facilitated a panel titled Religion in Independent Schools: Innovations in Multicultural Education. The panel members were three independent school practitioners who have used Tanenbaum’s work successfully, and they shared their perspectives with over 100 attendees.
 
It was gratifying to see how our creative panelists have taken our pedagogy and lessons, and adapted them to fit their classrooms’ needs. A major take-away from this experience was the power of co-presenting at conferences. Also, the standing-room only crowd goes to show that issues around religious identity in schools are not limited to the topic of separation of church and state in public schools. One of the Education program’s initiatives is to work more deeply with independent school educators. Seems like we’re off to a great start!
– Anshu Wahi, Senior Program Associate