Tree of Life Synagogue – 5 Ways to Take Action

In the wake of the Tree of Life synagogue shooting, many people felt sadness, anger, fear—and hopelessness. All of those reactions linger today. But the Tree of Life tragedy should also be a call to action. As the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. said in his famous ‘I Have a Dream’ speech, 

“Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.
It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of this moment.”

It was true then and it is true now. Bigotry and violence should have no place in our country. And there are things we can do about it…

VOTE!

Election Day is Tuesday, November 6!

Every 2 years we have an opportunity to shape the legislative branch of our federal, state and local governments. Whether you have been satisfied or dissatisfied with how your public representatives have been voting or responding to current events, this is your opportunity to make sure that those who reflect your vision of America get a seat at the decision-making table!

For more information about where, when and how to vote, click here!

DONATE!

Tanenbaum systematically dismantles religious hatred and violence and promotes respect for people of all religious beliefs. Last week, we were named 1 of the top 5 interreligious organizations to support (see article here). 

Our actions can make a difference and supporting organizations that preserve freedom of religion and respect is one of the best ways to take action. 

CLICK HERE TO DONATE NOW!

PARTICIPATE IN CIVIL DISCOURSE!

Bullying, marginalization, violence and propaganda. None of it’s new. What is new is the scale, frequency and ubiquitousness of disinformation. Tanenbaum’s Combating Extremism campaign is a public education initiative that dismantles stereotypes and counters fake news. As part of this campaign, we regularly post free, practical resources for home, work, school, places of worship and/or your community. Below are some of our resources for beginning conversations: 

Click here for the access to all Combating Extremism campaign resources.

INTENTIONALLY CREATE SPACE!

This is the moment for communities to invest time and energy in one another. One way is to intentionally create space for interfaith and cross-group action projects in your communities. Another is to proactively establish conversations and dialogues in your houses of faith, community centers and homes – and to practice listening even when you may disagree. Some organization with helpful resources include United Religions InitiativeInterfaith Youth Core and Interfaith Center of Greater Philadelphia.

ENGAGE WITH US ON SOCIAL MEDIA!​​​​​​​

TUNE INTO OUR LIVESTREAM! – On Thursday, November 15th, Controversial Conversations: A story of collaboration between a Sikh and a skinhead. Listen and learn from this important discussion between a former extremist and leader in the white nationalist movement, Arno Michaelis, and his partner Pardeep Kaleka on how they moved beyond hate. Make sure to tune into Tanenbaum’s Facebook or Instagram for the livestream at 6pm that evening!

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA! – Keep up to date with interreligious understanding news and events by following us on social media! Followers receive regular updates about everything religion related from around the world, as well as local interreligious activities and conversations from across the nation.

SHARE, COMMENT, REPOST! – When you engage in the conversation, you help us as we keep working to make a better world.

A Fall Festival of Lights

Dear Friends,

Did you know that Diwali, known as the Festival of Lights, will take place on November 7th? Hindus, Jains, Sikhs and some Buddhists around the world celebrate this New Year festival for a variety of different reasons.
 
Diwali is an official holiday in a number of countries in South Asia and across the globe, so your offices in those locations may be closed or have shorter work days. Check out our Diwali Fact Sheet to learn more about the festival and potential implication for your workplace.
 
In friendship,
 
Deputy CEO,
Mark Fowler
 

Photos L to R: Khorkarahman, Wikimedia Commons; Srijan Kundu, Flickr; Mitacmaitra, Pixabay

International Day of Peace

Friends,
 
This year’s International Day of Peace celebrates the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This document lays out a vision of human rights for all. As such, it is critical to all of us.
 
But what needs to be remembered is that the Declaration itself, and much of the work that has followed its powerful release, would not exist without women – including women of faith – who are involved in the peacebuilding process. As head of the Human Rights Commission, it was a woman, Eleanor Roosevelt, who was instrumental in composing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The work that has grown from that document would not exist if not for that one visionary woman.
 
​​​​​​​Yesterday, I had the privilege of speaking on a panel at the United Nations General Assembly called Keeping Faith in Sustainable Peace: Women of Faith as Agents of Transformation. I spoke alongside professor Hind Kabawat, a member of Tanenbaum’s Peacemakers in Action Network, along with Fatima Madaki, from Search for Common Ground and a KAICIID International Fellow. These women, along with myself, are living proof that women of faith can and should be recognized for the roles we play in the peace and reconciliation process, as formal and more often informal, agents of peace. Among our panel, we unanimously agreed that before anything else, UN leaders, diplomats, government officials and religious leaders within various communities MUST collaborate with women as allies and partners in the conversation. Women need more than a seat at the table. They need many seats. 
 
Early on, Tanenbaum saw the importance of women of faith in peace, and committed to formally recognizing women among our Peacemakers. Today, the Peacemakers in Action Network includes 10 women of faith – from all different conflict zones, who each live out their faith in different ways that build towards sustainable peace and inclusion. 
 
Too often the role women play as agents of peace is undervalued and often straight out ignored. Their work, their perspectives, their existence must be recognized. So today, to honor the past 70 years and look towards the next 70, let’s change how we work together – and make sure that we are working with the multitudes of women who make peace possible internationally.
 
And just in case you still have doubts about the power of religious and faith-based women peacebuilders…please take a few minutes to review Tanenbaum’s resource sheet, Women Who Pursue Peace and Justice, on the female peacemakers we recognize and partner with, and the important work they’re doing.
 
Yours in peace, 
 
Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO, Tanenbaum 

Education Matters! Reflections on Combating Extremism!

Friends,

What we learn today, shapes the world we live in tomorrow. And whether we can engage in critical discussions based on facts will make all the difference.

That’s why our Combating Extremism campaign exists – to provide objective analysis, facts and questions to ponder. We wanted to know if you agreed, and sent a survey to hear what you really think!

More than 55% of those who responded agreed…Education Matters! You think it’s the most important tool for combating extremism and hate. But you also had other things to say. Take a look at what you’ve learned so far – and some of the things that surprised you!

And if you didn’t give us your feedback, please take 5 minutes and tell us what you think!

By learning, listening and asking hard questions….we can find a path to respect,

Joyce Dubensky,
CEO, Tanenbaum

Photo credit: Adam Patterson | Panos/DFID

Genocide Finally Named in Scathing UN Report

Dear Friends,

This week, the U.N. released a report that calls for Myanmar’s military leaders to be prosecuted for genocide due to the ruthless and inhumane treatment of the Rohingya, a minority group from Myanmar.

What is happening to the Rohingya?

In Myanmar, religious and ethnic hatred has forced 700,000 Muslim Rohingya to fearfully flee their homes. This hatred was fueled, in part, by extremist Buddhist monks, who see the Rohingya as a religious and ethnic threat.

While this crisis may seem recent, it’s unfortunately part of a much longer story. At Tanenbaum, we’ve been watching this nightmare unfold. Given the new report, we are reissuing the following resources we created in late 2017:

The Rohingya crisis is a stark reminder that extremism touches people from all religions. By combating extremism anywhere, we combat extremism everywhere,

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO, Tanenbaum


Image: UNHCR/Roger Arnold

Sharia: Just the Facts

Dear Friends,
Do you know…
What Sharia is really all about? How it’s practiced? What it means in the U.S.?
Questions about Sharia are everywhere—in homes and schools, state legislatures and even our courts. These questions need fact-based answers. It’s the only way to move past our cultural assumptions and stereotypes.
That’s why Tanenbaum’s Combating Extremism campaign created a fact sheet addressing common questions about Sharia! Explore its similarities to Judaism’s Halakah, and Catholicism’s canon law. See how Sharia is one more piece of America’s beautiful religious diversity!
Join us to stop hate and Combat Extremism. Let’s get talking!
With an open heart—and open ears,
Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO, Tanenbaum ​​​​​​​
P.S. Whether you convene a formal conversation, engage in an off-the-cuff discussion with family, friends, or colleagues, or simply review and/or pass along Tanenbaum’s Combating Extremism resources on social media or in person, we encourage you to send an email tocombatingextremism@tanenbaum.org and let us know. And of course, please include stories including any on how your ideas or behavior (or anyone else’s) shifted.
P.P.S. When you support Tanenbaum, you help us in the battle for a world where people across beliefs live side by side, free from extremism, persecution and hate.

Image credit Ilmgate

Eid Mubarak!

Dear Friends,

The Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha will be celebrated between August 20th and August 21st this year! Eid-al-Adha, also known as the Feast of the Sacrifice, is an important holiday and those observing may wish to take the day off from work to celebrate with family and friends and attend to religious practices like attending mosque.

To learn more about Eid al-Adha and its potential impact on the workplace, read our Eid al-Adha Fact Sheet!

In friendship,

Mark Fowler
Deputy CEO, Tanenbaum


Image credit: Seika via Flickr

Our Neighbors, Our Border

Dear Friends,

Across our nation, we are agonizing—and debating—the fate of children being torn from their parents at our border. This is a policy debate. It is a moral debate. And, it is a religious debate. How we read and understand our faith traditions is fueling our views. How we respond reveals our core values.

Today, is World Refugee Day.

It is a time to remember how our many traditions require us to care for the stranger. To encourage Congress to act and to affirm the Governors who will not let their National Guard participate in the separation of families. It is also time to make sure we are informed. To help, Tanenbaum has updated its Combating Extremism resource, A Q&A on Refugees.

We can call the children at our border, and their parents, many names. Often, refugee, asylum seeker, migrant and undocumented are appropriate. But so is stranger. Let’s welcome them and treat them as each of us would want to be treated.

Doing so would honor our traditions,

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO, Tanenbaum


Image Credit: John Moore / Getty Images

Limited time opportunity! Free copies of Religions in My Neighborhood

Religions in My Neighborhood Makes it Easier to Teach About Religion
Tanenbaum’s curriculum, framed by Wiggins and McTighe’s Understanding by Design, makes teachers’ jobs easier. Teachers can use Religions in My Neighborhood as a stand-alone curriculum or as a supplement.

SPECIAL TIME-LIMITED OFFER!
For the first time ever, we are giving away copies of Religions in My Neighborhood for free ($34.95 value)!

Email education@tanenbaum.org for your free copy today!

 

The Right Way to Talk about Extremism & Religion

Dear Friends:

There is no other way to say it. Extremism is rising as our country grows more polarized. Church shootings. Synagogue desecration. Muslim and Sikh youth harassed. Equally troubling are the countless other injustices that fail to make the headlines. It can feel unsurmountable, but there is hope.

Over two years ago, we launched Tanenbaum’s Combating Extremism campaign to get us talking and listening to one another—and especially to those whose beliefs and ideologies differ from our own. Because that is where the hope lies. In each of us.

This means taking responsibility for what we know—and what we don’t. And it means finding out the real facts.

That’s why our Combating Extremism resources are designed to counter misinformation and/or our lack of information about some of today’s most pressing and complex religion-related issues. So that our conversations are based on accurate, objective facts.

To help you share—and discuss—what you learn from these resources in positive ways, Tanenbaum created a “How To” guide for this installment of Combating Extremism:

Guidelines for Conducting Open Conversations; and
Guidelines for Conducting Open Conversations – A Summary

Based on Tanenbaum’s 25 years of work, we know that conversations are critical to bridging divides, which can help prevent individuals from feeling marginalized—a risk factor believed to increase some people’s susceptibility to extremist ideology.

Join us in our efforts to stop hate and Combat Extremism. Let’s get talking!

With an open heart—and open ears,

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO, Tanenbaum

P.S. Whether you convene a formal conversation, engage in an off-the-cuff discussion with family, friends, or colleagues, or simply review and/or pass along Tanenbaum’s Combating Extremism resources on social media or in person, we encourage you to send an email to combatingextremism@tanenbaum.org and let us know. Please include stories that highlight how your ideas or behavior (or those of other participants) shifted, if available, as a result.

P.P.S. When you support Tanenbaum, you help us in the battle for a world where people across beliefs live side by side, free from extremism, persecution and hate.