Religion & End of Life Care – Health Care Insights

Dear Friends,

Welcome to the fourth installment of Tanenbaum’s Health Care Insights series!

This month’s issue features what might be one of the most challenging subjects for health care providers: upholding religious beliefs while delivering end of life care.

  • The Scenario: A Jewish family objects to a DNR order for a patient who is brain stem dead, based on a religious belief that death only occurs when a patient’s heart and breathing have stopped.
  • Click here to learn about the family’s objection and its religious context, and how the hospital can respectfully manage this objection by working with the family and their religious leader.

For additional case studies from our medical school curriculum, click here. To learn more about the intersections of religion and health care, check out Tanenbaum’s full Medical Manual, which can be purchased here. (Contact us for discounted bulk and institutional purchase rates for the eBook version.)

In friendship,

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO

Conscience in Health Care: Navigating Tricky Terrain

Dear Friends,

Welcome to the third installment of Tanenbaum’s Health Care Insights series.

This month’s issue features a religiously motivated conscientious refusal involving attire in the health care workplace:

  • The Scenario: A Sikh physician wears a full beard due to his religious beliefs regarding uncut hair. This conflicts with the hospital’s policy regarding safety and hygiene.
  • Click here to learn about the religious context underlying the physician’s choice and how the hospital can find an alternative that can accommodate the physician’s requirements, while still ensuring patient safety.

For additional case studies from our medical school curriculum, click here. To learn more about the intersections of religion and health care, Tanenbaum’s full Medical Manual can be purchased here. (Contact us for discounted bulk and institutional purchase rates for the eBook version.)

In friendship,

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO

Dietary Restrictions & Health Care Resources

Dear Friends,

Welcome to the second installment of Tanenbaum’s new Health Care Insights series!

Each Health Care Insight will present a challenging scenario that sometimes arises in health care, and a download link to information from our Medical School Curriculum, where you will find context about the religious practice involved and better practices for health care providers.

This month’s blog post features religion, dietary restrictions and the impact on health care:

  • The Scenario: The son of an 85-year-old Hindu woman suffering from dementia is extremely upset, when he walks into his mother’s hospital room and finds her eating a meatball.
  • Click here to learn about how the mother’s and son’s religious beliefs influenced this encounter, and some better practices that health care providers can use to avoid or manage this type of situation.

For additional case studies from our medical school curriculum, click here. To learn more about the intersections of religion and health care, Tanenbaum’s full Medical Manual can be purchased here. (Contact us for discounted bulk and institutional purchase rates for the eBook version.)

In friendship,

Joyce S. Dubensky

Conrad Tao Wows – and Connects with Tanenbaum

Last night marked another exceptional performance by Conrad Tao, a dear friend to Tanenbaum and an awe-inspiring artist.  One attendee went so far as to say, “What inner voice; what passion; what power; what joy; what contrasts… what a great concert… and all after a lovely reception with the beauty of songs of peace!”  If you’d like a taste of Conrad’s work, take a look at this video.  

As he did last year, Conrad brought the audience of the 2nd annual A Piece for Peace concert to their feet in a program that included Bach, Chopin, Liszt, and Prokofiev – and a Conrad Tao original! 
 
Almost more impressive, though, was the way Conrad broke the invisible, yet tangible screen between himself and the audience, when he shared his thoughts on Prokofiev’s Sonata Number 7.  Before playing the piece, he explained how Prokofiev wrote the work under extreme duress imposed by Joseph Stalin, and how, in Conrad’s opinion, that the work reflects Prokofiev’s intense desire for peace worldwide, both within us all and between us all.  We couldn’t agree more with Conrad’s statement that, “difference is not something we should fear, but something we should celebrate.”
 
The connection between the piece, the performer, and the audience was remarkable. 
 
If you would like to hear more of Conrad’s work, his Julliard Sessions are now available on itunes.
 
Thank you to all who joined us last night.  And to those who could not come, we look forward to seeing you next year.
 
Mike Ward
Communications Associate