Tonight’s the Night to Confront Hate!

Tonight is the night to join us at “Confronting Hate: Examining Anti-Semitism Through Religious and Ideological World Views.” Please see below for some important information and reminders.

If you are joining us in person, the doors will open at 6:00 pm. This Courageous Conversation will take place from 6:30 – 8:00 pm at One Spirit Learning Alliance (247 West 36th St, 6th floor). Please check-in at our registration table upon arrival.

If you are joining us remotely, please click the link below to join the webinar via Zoom:

https://zoom.us/j/6374166188

Or Telephone:

US: +1 646 876 9923

Webinar ID: 637 416 6188

Please be advised that this webinar will be recorded live and will be posted online following the event.

Food for the event is sponsored by Khyber Pass. The Courageous Conversation event series is made possible thanks to our partners at the Nissan Foundation!

Please contact Dasha Tanner, dtanner@tanenbaum.org if you have any questions.

It’s Been a Long Year Since Tree of Life

Stronger Together (AP Photo – Greg Bull)

In the year since the Tree of Life massacre, 12 white supremacists were arrested for targeting, planning to target or threatening attacks against Jews and Jewish institutions. There were also other threats, as worldwide anti-Semitism continued to multiply.

That is the dark side of a global story that has not stopped unfolding after the deadly shooting in Pittsburgh. But there is another story. The story of international outrage and collective action as allies and upstanders unify against the hatred. We saw it after Tree of Life, and we saw it just few weeks ago yet again. On Yom Kippur, a synagogue in Halle, Germany was targeted by a gunman, and Anti anti-Semitism protests emerged across Germany by the thousands.

We need to stand up together. And to do this we must be armed with the information, and the resources to respond to those who pursue hate. That’s why, as part of Tanenbaum’s Combating Extremism campaign, we are honoring Pittsburgh’s tragic anniversary by sharing our newest fact sheet—Anti-Semitism – What, Where and Why.

We ask you to check it out and let us know what you think. And then please share it with friends, allies and those who think differently from you. Because we all have a lot to learn. And together, we are stronger than hate.

With reflection & hope,

Joyce

 

A Shooting On Yom Kippur


Friends –

As many of you know, I am Jewish. That’s why I was in Temple on Yom Kippur, when a gunman in Germany again tried to slaughter Jews as they prayed. He did not succeed in getting into the synagogue where over 50 worshippers sat together.

So he took his hate out on others nearby, apparently trying to fulfill the pledge he made in his online manifesto. “If I fail and die, but kill a single Jew, it was worth it…After all, if every White man kills just one, we win.”

My Rabbi condemned this violent act of anti-Semitism, as she remembered Pittsburgh and Poway.

Jews around the world—including in the U.S.—are at risk because of anti-Semitism. And horrifically, so are many others. This hate is not limited to targeting my Jewish community. It affects Muslims and Christians in countries all around the world. It targets Bahá’ís and Sikhs and Hindus.

Anti-Semitism reflects these wider social trends. It is often referred to as the “canary in the coal mine,” and often indicates a rise in stereotyping, demonizing others and widespread bigotry and hate.

And that’s why we are addressing this issue on November 14th, during a courageous conversation called Confronting Hate: Examining Anti-Semitism through Religious and Ideological World Views. It’s time to tackle violence against Jews head-on—and how it can fuel hatred against so many others.

We must stand together as allies to condemn anti-Semitism. And to protect one another.

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO, Tanenbaum

 


 

Less Than Three-In-Ten Americans Know Rosh Hashana Is The Jewish New Year

Friends-

Did you know that 8 in 10 Americans correctly answer questions about Christian traditions? But that less than 3 out of 10 Americans are familiar with some basic facts about other religions—including Judaism? (See the Pew Research Center’s new poll: What Americans Know about Religion).
Given the surge in anti-Semitic hate crimes being reported, those statistics are particularly disturbing. We’d like to know what you think about anti-Semitism: what it is, where it shows up and why there’s so much of it.

Please spend just a few minutes and take our short anti-Semitism survey!

With respectful curiosity,

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO, Tanenbaum

How Much Do You Know About Anti-Semitism? Take Our Combating Extremism Survey!

Tanenbaum spends a lot of time thinking about anti-Semitism. And one thing that seems pretty clear, is that people don’t always have a clear understanding of anti-Semitism—what it is, how it works and why it matters.

We know that anti-Semitism is real. And while anti-Semitism is often broadly understood as violent hatred of Jews, or hatred that bears the threat of such violence, sometimes anti-Semitism is quieter and just shows up as microaggressions.

So we want to know what you know and think about anti-Semitism. Please tell us by spending a few minutes taking our Combating Extremism short anti-Semitism survey!

We look forward to hearing what you have to say!

 


 

How you choose to react depends on who you—and who we are.

Friends—
 
I am sad—again. Once more, on behalf of Tanenbaum, I send our sympathy to the families of the deceased and injured in Saturday’s Synagogue shooting in California. 
 
I am also troubled. Because the violence isn’t a surprise. Hating others based on their religion is now normalized.  
 
While the reality is that only a minority of individuals take hate to the extreme, with a new attack every week, it doesn’t feel that way. It seems easier to define and castigate other people based on their differences. It takes more for us to see people, acknowledge them, be respectfully curious, and inclusive.
 
Which direction you choose is up to you—and up to all of us. 
 
That’s why Tanenbaum persists through heartbreak and today’s hate-filled realities. That’s why we work to stop daily acts of bigotry, counter extremism, and support our Peacemakers—women and men who stand up to violence in Sri Lanka, Yemen, Indonesia, and Bosnia—people just like you and me.
 
Choosing to engage with people who are different isn’t always an easy choice. Yet, it is a choice we can make. And that includes those of us who already embrace differences, those who are wary, and even those who perpetrate hate.
 
Don’t believe me? Check out this clip on one former white supremacist taking another to his first meeting with a Jewish person. You’ll see that we can reach across differences. 

With sorrow and fierce determination.

Joyce S. Dubensky

CEO, Tanenbaum

What Anti-Semitism Sounds Like—National Tell a Story Day

Storytelling is an ancient practice used to pass knowledge from one generation to the next. It’s a way we share lessons learned and experiences that inform all of us.

On Saturday, our nation celebrates Tell a Story Day. And in preparation of that event, we’re sharing one man’s story about his first encounter with anti-Semitism. It tells us what it sounded like in his youth, and helps us understand what that felt like—and still feels like today.

Because anti-Semitism isn’t just some abstract idea. It’s real. And it hurts.

A Path Forward: Confronting Hate in America

Ken Parker, prior to leaving the KKK and NSM.

Knowing anti-Semitism is on the rise again. Seeing what happened in Charlottesville, then Pittsburg. Hearing the chants, “Jews will not replace us.” In honor of Holocaust Remembrance Day, we have to ask the hard question.

Are there some people—bigots and extremists—who are so extreme, they just can’t change?  Our answer, “NO!”

Support for this can be found in Deeyah Kahn’s beautiful, courageous and heart-wrenching Netflix documentary White Right: Meeting the Enemy. In the film, on the Unite the Right rally and the white nationalists who participated, Kahn introduces us to white supremacist leader and Born Again Christian, Ken Parker. At that time, he was active in the Nationalist Socialist Movement (NSM) and a Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). 

Ken hands over his Grand Dragon robe to race relations expert Daryl Davis

The film captures what Ken had to say during the 2017 rally

Jews and homosexuals, they should be exterminated, every single one of them.” 

I absolutely despise Jews, so yes I’m a racist.”

“I will never break bread with a Jew! Ever.”

Today it’s different. Ken is now a “former.” He retired from the NSM and the KKK and denounces hate groups. Part of his evolution included a process of reconciliation, and Ken reaching out to the very people who he used to vilify.

Ken Parker with Jewish Holocaust Educator, Tamara Meyer

Tanenbaum’s Combating Extremism campaign partnered with Arno Michaelis, a former leader in the skinhead movement and now a peacebuilder, who pushed Ken to meet his first Jew—something he vowed never to do.

Arno introduced Ken to Tamara Meyer, a Jewish Holocaust Educator, and to race relations expert Daryl Davis, and videotaped Ken “break bread with a Jew.”  And now, in partnership with Arno, we are proud to present what happened.

A Path Forward: Confronting Hate in America, affirms that a powerful way to move forward through hate is with empathy, understanding and respect. Take a look. And let us know what you think.

 

Tree of Life – Pittsburgh Synagogue

Friends–

With a heavy heart, Tanenbaum condemns the violence that erupted yesterday morning at the Tree of Life Synagogue near Pittsburgh. At least eleven are dead. Families irrevocably shattered. At least six injured. And a shooter who was reportedly making anti-Semitic comments as this slaughter unfolded.

The scale and gravity of this attack, coming only a week after bomb threats, scares all of us—as Americans and as individuals from a variety of minority religious tradition in our diverse country. This shooting is part of a larger pattern in which people are being targeted for their beliefs—religious and also social and political.

Bigotry and violence have no place in America. The discourse that divides, dehumanizes and demeans civility lays the groundwork for violence. That is why we must all stand shoulder to shoulder with those who exercise their sacred right to pray together, to practice their faith, to peacefully assemble, and to advocate for their beliefs.

Tanenbaum strongly urges all communities and groups to reject the violence of hate and the discourse that breeds it. This includes the anti-Semitism so horrifically visible at the Tree of Life Synagogue. Our hearts are with all those who lost loved ones and were injured. Our commitment is to you and to our national values.

We stand—always—for a world that respects and protects our differences—including our different ways of believing.

 


Image: Vector Illustration

Washington had opinions on Religious Freedom-Combating Extremism

Dear Friends,

To the Founding Fathers, freedom of religion was a cornerstone of American democracy—even before the Bill of Rights was adopted.

Need proof? Check out the correspondence between America’s first president, George Washington, and Moses Seixas, the Hazzan of Newport’s Touro Synagogue of Congregation Jeshuat Israel. While they excluded enslaved African Americas and Native Americans from their vision of religious freedom, their commitment to freedom of conscience and their words contain timeless insights and values—that must to be applied to all.

On this July 4th, we’re sharing a Combating Extremism resource titled:  The President and the Hazzan, along with Questions that prompt discussion.

Join us in defending our founding values and Combating Extremism,

Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO, Tanenbaum

P.S. We are thrilled to announce that Tanenbaum is a 2018 Nissan Foundation grant recipient in support of our Combating Extremism campaign! Read our press release here.


Image Credit: Touro Synagogue. Wikipedia