What can YOU do about extremism?

Dear Friends,

As we send out this month’s Combating Extremism campaign materials, we pause to note the attack this week at Ohio State University.

The perpetrator was Somali and Muslim. Those are facts. But another fact is that the motive for the incident has not yet been determined. And yet, the profile of the attacker will cause some people to jump to conclusions. To stereotype. We must not only resist this temptation ourselves, but also actively help others avoid doing so. There is yet one more important fact: many terrorist acts in the U.S. are not committed by Muslims, immigrants, or refugees. Rather, a large number are committed by people from other groups—often white supremacists.

It reminds us why, when we asked you what you thought of extremism, you had a lot to say. Including strong opinions about what each of us can do—starting with education.This month’s Combating Extremism materials will help you do exactly that – providing techniques to counter misinformation, stereotypes and the resulting alienation that can fuel extremism … because how we teach can be as important as what we teach, and how we speak can be as important as what we say.

Take a look and let us know what you think:

Please download, share and use our monthly resources. Encourage friends, neighbors, educators and community leaders to sign up to receive our free Combating Extremism materials.

In the words of one survey respondent, “[Extremism] starts with the average person, and it is with the average person it might end. Indeed, what can an average person not do about extremism!”

In solidarity,
Joyce S. Dubensky
CEO