Santorum Ill Over JFK’s Speech on Religion: News Roundup

 

In the news this week: Santorum sick over JFK speech, a report in the UK claims religious illiteracy in Parliament, the number of mosques in the U.S. has grown tremendously, and other stories.
 
Rick Santorum said Sunday that John F. Kennedy's 1960 speech on the separation of church and state made him want to "throw up." On Tuesday, he said he wished he "had that particular line back."
 
When conservative radio host Laura Ingraham challenged him on the apparently off-message comments that have provoked considerable controversy, the GOP presidential candidate said, "I would agree with you on that. I wish I had that particular line back."
 
Yet Santorum went on to defend his criticism of Kennedy's speech and launched an attack on President Barack Obama. Huffington Post
 
Rick Santorum's political good fortune in the Republican presidential primaries has come about in large part because of his appeal to evangelicals. A Roman Catholic, he is a beneficiary of more than two decades of cooperation between conservative Protestants and Catholics who set aside theological differences for the common cause of the culture war. San Francisco Chronicle
 
(United Kingdom) A report from a cross-party parliamentary group will this week warn that there is a widespread lack of “religious literacy” among the country’s judges, politicians and officials.
 
It also claims that the rights of homosexuals take precedence over those of Christians.
 
The study, by the Christians in Parliament group, follows a series of rulings by judges against Christians who had claimed that following their faith brought them into conflict with the law or with their employer. The Telegraph
 
Recent video games have begun depicting religion as a violent, problematic force, according to research from a new University of Missouri study.
 
Greg Perreault, a doctoral student at University of Missouri's School of Journalism, studied five extremely popular games from the last few years that incorporate religion heavily into their storylines: "Mass Effect 2," "Final Fantasy XIII," "Assassin's Creed," "Castlevania: Lords of Shadow," and "The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion."
 
In each case, Perreault found that religion became equated with violence within the video games' narratives. Christian Post
 
A measure to ban the use of foreign laws in domestic courtrooms is progressing in Florida's statehouse, one of dozens of similar efforts across the country that critics call an unwarranted campaign driven by fear of Muslims.
 
Forty such bills are being pursued in 24 states, according to a tally by the National Conference of State Legislatures, a movement backers say is a response to a glaring hole in legal protections for Americans. Opponents say the bills simply address a made-up threat and could threaten agreements made under Jewish or other religious law.
 
The Florida measure passed the House on Thursday 92-24. It awaits a full vote in the Senate. The Detroit News
 
In the decade since 9/11, American Muslims and mosques have come under a close lens, from congressional hearings on radicalization to campaigns against mosque construction projects and anti-Sharia legislation proposals in dozens of states.
 
Despite such difficulties, a comprehensive survey of American mosque leaders released Wednesday reveals that the number of mosques in the country has grown tremendously, with more than 900 new centers being established since 2000. Another finding from the survey reveals that compared to the turn of the millennium, fewer Muslims see America as "hostile" to Islam today. Huffington Post